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Events, Games

Now Play This 2017

Now Play This 2017 is over! It ran from 7-9 April, and we’ve collected a few pictures (taken by Ben Peter Catchpole) above – click through the gallery to see them, or pop over to our Facebook gallery to see a larger selection.

You can also read about how other visitors found the experience, and catch up on their pictures, with:

And don’t forget that until 7 May, you can still visit Game Changers: Another Way to Play, an exhibition looking at billiards, chess, mazes and their evolution over time. (We’ll write a little more about Game Changers next week…)

Games We Found at the V&A

used with permission from The Victoria and Albert Museum: Photographer – Gabriel Bertogg

The V&A is in an extraordinary place. Every surface of the Victorian building is embellished, and once you start looking at the building between the exhibits it’s hard to stop. Every section of floor seems to have a different pattern of tiles. Each stairwell has its own visual schema.

Events, Games, Physical, Research

The Scientific Village Fete at New Scientist Live

click through gallery above

From 22 to 25 September, we ran the Scientific Village Fete at New Scientist Live, a four-day festival of ideas and discovery.

Our corner of the festival invited passers-by to play traditional village-fete-style games – but with an astronomical twist.

In the Planet Shy, people threw balls coconut-shy style – but their aim was to knock down a scale model of the Solar System.

In The Two-Body Problem, a classic demonstration of how gravity works became a head-to-head challenge, as groups of players rolled marbles planets into orbit.

In Space on Earth, a co-operative game created by Saffron Parker, players put their hands into simulated spacesuit gloves and had to try to screw on nuts and bolts and tie ropes together.

And in game-show-style So Wrong It’s Right, performers drew the crowds before challenging players to go head-to-head against the quirks of their own brain, with a challenge that used the Stroop Effect to turn something quite simple (say seven random words) into a real challenge.

The games drew thousands of players over four days – including real live astronaut Al Worden, shown playing here with Sumit Paul-Choudhury, the festival director (and editor-in-chief of New Scientist).