Science Village Fete in Singapore

We were lucky enough to be invited by GEEK Margate to bring a couple of pieces from the Science Village Fete to the Maker Extravaganza run in the Science Centre Singapore for the 40th Anniversary of Maker Faire. The Science Centre were great hosts and have a brilliant museum chock-full of brilliant physical exhibits. We ran Space on Earth and the Gravity Game bilingually for the first time, in English and Chinese, and met Makers from all around the world.

July physical play roundup

July! And here’s some of what’s going on in city play and physical games…

Open Calls

The Interesting Games Lab is back in Bristol, after a long sleep of quite a few years! This is really exciting –  Iglab was one of the earliest regular events for games with a big physical component, letting people meet up and playtest and  discuss their medium. It’s so fantastic to see it back with a run of events over the latter half of the year. The next Iglab (now run by Free Ice Cream) is on 25 July, or you can submit a game (there’s a selection of themes) for another event in the run.

And in London, Beta Public – a night of performance and videogames – has been announced for 13 November. They don’t have a call for at a bit of info about the event (or book tickets).

Art Deck

So, late last year we ran a series of drawing games, called Drawing Games because we’re really bad at names, at No Quarter. And one of them in particular – named Art Deck, for reasons as listed above – we really liked. Over the last six months we’ve been working on it, on and off, testing it out and developing it as part of the London Creative Network artist development programme.

The way the game works is: you lay out cards, one at a time, to form a sentence. There are three sentence parts. The first is usually a clear instruction: “draw a rectangle”, “draw some eyes”, “smash something against the paper”. The second is usually a compositional constraint or an adverb of some sort: “near the edge of the page”, “in red”, “petulantly”. The final card usually makes things difficult, or funny, or both: “behind your back”, “while carrying a burden”, “with your wrong hand”.